Lavender Languages and nonbinary pronouns (again)

Last week I attended the Lavender Languages conference for the first time, and it was my best conference experience yet! There were plenty of interesting talks on nonbinary topics, and I of course talked about nonbinary pronouns again. This time the focus was on the nonbinary participants' personal experiences, but I also compared the nonbinary … Continue reading Lavender Languages and nonbinary pronouns (again)

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Acceptability of nonbinary pronouns

In July I presented on nonbinary pronouns again, this time at the isLE conference in London. You can download my slides here (I suggest using presentation mode due to animations blocking content otherwise). My presentation was divided into three parts: usage, acceptability, and attitudes. I've already written about all three topics on this blog (Attitudes towards … Continue reading Acceptability of nonbinary pronouns

Attitudes towards nonbinary pronouns

Earlier this week, I gave a presentation on 'attitudes towards nonbinary pronouns' at the Finnish Annual Conference in Linguistics. You can download my updated slides from this link. This was the second time I presented on nonbinary pronouns; last year, at the HELSLANG summer conference, I presented some preliminary results about the acceptability of nonbinary pronouns, … Continue reading Attitudes towards nonbinary pronouns

How inclusive are generic pronouns? (Part 5 preliminary results)

The purpose of part 5 was to find out how gender-inclusive generic pronominal references are viewed to be. In contrast to other parts of the survey, the dependent possessive pronouns (also called pronominal possessive determiners, or just possessive determiners) his, her, their, and his or her were used, mainly to avoid repeating the nominative personal … Continue reading How inclusive are generic pronouns? (Part 5 preliminary results)

Which generic pronouns are acceptable? (Part 3 preliminary results)

The purpose of part 3 was to see which generic pronouns the participants would view as ‘acceptable’, and which as ‘not acceptable’. ‘Acceptable’ was defined as something that the participants themselves would view as ‘natural or correct language use’[1] (in contrast to what a grammar book might find as ‘acceptable’). They, he, she, and he … Continue reading Which generic pronouns are acceptable? (Part 3 preliminary results)

Generic pronouns (Part 2 preliminary results)

Part 2 consisted of several ‘fill in the blank’ tasks, of which some were filler questions and the rest (9 tasks) were designed to elicit 3rd person singular generic pronouns (i.e. a pronoun could be filled in the blank). The fillers concentrated on preposition and article use, and different spelling variants (e.g. burned vs. burnt). … Continue reading Generic pronouns (Part 2 preliminary results)

Is a successful person a he, a she or a they? (Part 1 preliminary results)

In part 1, I asked the participants to describe in a few sentences what in their opinion is a successful person. The purpose of this task was to elicit generic 3rd person singular pronoun usage, i.e. to see which (3rd person singular) pronouns the participants would use to refer to an unknown, unspecific, generic person, … Continue reading Is a successful person a he, a she or a they? (Part 1 preliminary results)